FEATHER CARE AND STORAGE
FLY TYING FEATHERS

FLY TYING INSTRUCTION
http://www.flytyinginstruction.com
Fly tying equipment and materials
reference guide. Learn how to tie
flies for fishing and display.

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FEATHER CARE AND STORAGE
Some advice about taking care of fly tying feathers. Feathers can withstand a lot of punishment, but taking proper care of them will insure they stay pristine.


Feathers stored on their side.
Containers need a lid that can be tightly sealed.

STORAGE
Proper storage is important. Keep feathers in sealed plastic bags and store in containers with secure lids. Keep pelts in separate plastic bags using a cardboard backing with glossy finish that won't absorb the oil from the pelts. Don't store skins and capes on top of each other. The preferred method is side by side to prevent the feathers from flattening out.

BUGS, INSECTS AND PESTS
Normally bugs are not a problem with domestically raised birds and commercially sold feathers, but with wild birds it is almost guaranteed. Should your feathers ever become infested you could lose your compete inventory without proper precautions.


Peacock Eye Feather that was attacked by pests.
There was not much left except a pile of dust.

Proper storage will help prevent or delay an infestation from getting worse. Keeping fly tying feathers and skins in separate sealed plastic bags could make a difference between losing a couple feathers or losing all your feathers. The bugs and mites can eat their way out of plastic bag, but are less likely to eat their way in.


Varied Carpet Beetle
The carpet beetle is one of many
pests that can damage feathers.

BUGS, INSECTS AND PESTS
For more advice on preventing your fly tying feathers from becoming victims of a insect infestation:

CLEANING FEATHERS
Generally you don't have to clean commercially sold fly tying feathers, but with wild birds, dying purposes or they just got dirty, here are some recommended procedures.
• Wash by hand with WOOLITE
• Thoroughly rinse all the feathers.
• Let dry on a cloth towel for one or two days.

The natural oils in the feather are important and without them the feather would become brittle. Use caution and be gentle when washing the feathers. Don't use hot water or excessive scrubbing.

PHOTO HERE
Before and After Photos of a feather that has
been steamed. The ragged edges of the feather
barbs are now connected to the tips creating a
smooth even edge.

STEAMING FEATHERS
Steaming feathers can rejuvenate them and give them a more pristine appearance.

Steam can damage the feather if not careful. The first time you try steaming feathers consider it an experiment. Hold the feather in the steam a couple seconds at a time and check the results. Primp the barbs with your fingers and they should zip together giving the feather a new look.

BUYING NEW FEATHERS
When buying complete bird skins, the skin should be pliable and scrapped clean of any residue.

Commercially available bird skins and feathers bought in a fly tying shop will be clean and have uniform color when dyed. If acquiring bird skins and feathers from other sources then precautions should to be taken to avoid insects or other pests that could infest your fly tying supplies.

SUN AND UV RAYS
The sun's UV rays can and will quickly fade the colors of feathers and generally shorten the life of the feathers. If you are going to frame your flies like a piece of art, it is recommended to use UV blocking glass and don't hang them in direct sunlight or the colors, especially on dyed feathers will quickly fade. UV blocking glass will cost extra and top of the line premium glass is expensive. The best quality glass is more transparent and looks clean and clear compared to regular glass.

FEATHER CARE AND STORAGE
Some general advice about cleaning and storage of feathers.

ANATOMY OF A FEATHER
Description and parts of a feather

BUYING AND SELECTING FEATHERS
What to look for when buying feathers. As a beginner we bought a lot of worthless and damaged feathers. This page will help in the selection of good quality feathers.
 

MATCHING FEATHERS
How to match and pair feathers when tying feather wings on a fly.

FLY TYING FEATHERS:
AM-GOLD PHEASANT
ARGUS BODY FEATHERS
ARGUS HEN QUILL FEATHERS
ARGUS PRIMARY TAIL FEATHERS
ARGUS SECONDARY WING
BANKSIAN COCKATOO
BARRED WOOD DUCK FEATHERS
BIOTS (GOOSE / TURKEY)
BLUE EARED PHEASANT
BLUE EDGED MANTLE BODY
BRONZE MALLARD FEATHERS
BUSTARD FLORICAN FEATHERS
BUSTARD KORI FEATHERS
CHATTERER
CHUKAR SKINS
COQ DE LEON
COTINGA
CRANE FEATHERS
CUL DE CANARD (CDC)
DUCK QUILLS
EMU FEATHERS
GADWALL DUCK FLANK
GOLDEN PHEASANT SKINS
GOLDEN PHEASANT CREST
GOLDEN PHEASANT TAIL
GOLDEN PHEASANT TIPPETS
GOOSE SHOULDER FEATHERS
GRAY PEACOCK SINGLE EYES
GUINEA FOWL FEATHERS
HUNGARIAN PARTRIDGE
INDIAN CROW
JAY
JUNGLE COCK
KINGFISHER
LADY AMHERST CENTER TAIL
LADY AMHERST TIPPETS
LEMON DUCK FEATHERS
MACAW TAIL FEATHERS
MALAY PEACOCK SINGLE EYE
MALLARD SIDE FEATHERS
MALLARD WINGS
OSTRICH HERL
PARROT FEATHERS
PEACOCK FEATHERS
PEACOCK HERL
PEACOCK NECK FEATHERS
PEACOCK QUILL FEATHERS
PEACOCK SWORD FEATHERS
RINGNECK PHEASANT
SCARLET MACAW
SILVER PHEASANT
STARLING SKIN
SWAN FEATHERS
TEAL FEATHERS
TURKEY FEATHERS

WOOD DUCK FEATHERS

HACKLE FEATHERS
Hackle feathers are a complete subject in themselves and these pages will sort through some of the confusion.

MARABOU FEATHERS
Marabou are fluffy feathers that have a breathing action in the water.

FLY TYING INSTRUCTION
http://www.flytyinginstruction.com
Fly tying equipment and materials
reference guide. Learn how to tie
flies for fishing and display.
FLY TYING FEATHERS

FEATHER CARE AND STORAGE